Thursday’s Child – Montgomery’s Inn, Toronto

Thursday, December 1, 2011
Often in my Thursday posts I write about locales that are far away.  But sometimes I like to remind myself of the amazing places close to home.  So for the month of December, I’ll be writing about the city where I live, Toronto, and some fun Christmas activities in the area. 

Montgomery’s Inn is a local museum that was not only an inn, but also a bar, a farm and a homestead.  Established in a rural area in 1830 by Thomas and Margaret Montgomery, it’s now a busy city intersection. From the kitchen through the bar and ballroom, the curator has compiled enough information to keep any history student fascinated.  For example, tenants generally shared their room with strangers, and those rooms would have been unheated. The most popular drinks in the bar were beer and whiskey, but Montgomery also sold meals, cheese, crackers, tobacco and pipes.  And according to the inn brochure, “chairs were occasionally broken” in the bar.  Sounds like a lively place.

Although staff doesn’t decorate the inn itself (at the time, Christmas decorations weren’t in vogue), the tearoom is decorated.  And the range of activities over the next month is unbelievable: Visitors to the inn can take part in gingerbread workshops or participate in an evening of singing 19th century carols.  "A Christmas Carol" is being performed later this month.  And if you want a more mobile activity, the Twelfth Night Dance Party on January 7 is not to be missed.  (No chairs will be harmed in this activity.)

Montgomery’s Inn has been targeted for possible closure by the city to save funds. In addition to being a great landmark (and possibly the best place ever to attend a Twelfth Night Dance Party), it’s a true part of the community.  We have friends who rent the dining area every year to host a community potluck and when we go we’re reminded of how fortunate we are to live in a city that celebrates its history.  Let’s hope this history isn’t forgotten, and Montgomery’s Inn is saved.



23 comments:

Claudia said...

When I returned from Seattle I did a bike ride around the Twin Cities lakes - and remembered how beautiful my area is - so I love what you are doing. I also love that there is a Twelfth Night party!

Sue said...

What a beautiful Inn. I hope it's saved. We are having the same problem in California; many state parks are being threatened to close due to funding issues:(

Gloria said...

Look beautiful:)

laurie said...

It's a beautiful building..I hope it is saved, too.

Valerie said...

What a lovely, cozy inn. It would be a shame for a place so steeped in history to have to simply shut down. It would make a lovely home!

Elaine said...

Oh, how awful! I hope it can be saved, Beth. It looks like a wonderful place!

Joanne said...

What a beautiful building, the architecture and history of it both. I hope Toronto finds a way to preserve this gem.

Carol said...

That would be a terrible shame to close such a wonderful place, rich with history. I hope they find a way to save it.

Lizzy said...

This museum looks like quite a treasure...I hope it can be saved. I've yet to go to Toronto, and it's really not that far from Indiana~I hope to visit someday soon~

Deb said...

Hi Beth, I have to say I never grew tired of looking out at the Inn from my bedroom or living room window across the street. Sometimes at night I used to swear I saw ghostly figures moving past one of the upstairs windows! There are rumours it is haunted. Keeping my fingers crossed that it remains a treasured landmark for many more years to come.

Pachecopatty said...

The Inn looks gorgeous, I don't like to think of it closing. I chuckled at your broken chair comments, I guess the chairs were fairly light weight back in the day!

yummychunklet said...

What gorgeous photos!

Mary said...

What a stunning Inn! I love the stonework on the building.

Miriam said...

What a beautiful place :), Miriam@Meatless Meals For Meat Eaters

Stina Lindenblatt said...

I lived in Toronto one summer during grad school. I was working at the Defense and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine. I wish I had known about the inn. It sounds amazing.

Belinda said...

I love historic places like this that are locally-owned. I hope that it stay, too!

Joanne said...

That inn looks gorgeous! I feel like inns, in general, are underappreciated but thanks for bringing them back to our attention!

tenaciouslyyours.com said...

It should absolutely not be closed! Considering the fact that North America is not even an architectural spot on the map in comparison to the thousands of years-old structures of Europe, I feel like we have an obligation to celebrate the historical landmarks we do have!

Medeia Sharif said...

It looks like a lovely place and I do hope it gets saved.

Sam @ My Carolina Kitchen said...

What a lovely Inn with a fascinating past. I would love to visit sometime. It's so nice to hear that it's locally owned.
Sam

Neesie Natters said...

I'm lost for words when I hear about old buildings steeped with history being lost...once they've gone that's it.
I hope this one is saved. It's a beautiful building alone never mind all the history attached. Lets hope they reconsider.
I'd certainly visit if I was in the area :D

comfortablydomestic.com said...

I certainly hope that the city doesn't close the Montgomery Inn! It would be a shame for them to close such a beautiful gem.

Barbara Jean said...

I have never been there! I will have to make a trek...

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