Thursday's Child: Tak'alik Ab'aj, Guatemala

Thursday, January 22, 2015
Tak’alik Ab’aj is a pre-Columbian archaeological site situated near the Pacific coast of Guatemala. In the local Kiche Maya language, it means “Place of the Standing Stone”.

Tak’alik Ab’aj was a major centre of culture and trade, first rising in power around the 9th century BCE, and lasting until 200 AD or later. It’s particularly important among Central American archeological sites because it documents the transition between the early Guatemalan Olmec people and the Mayan civilization. 


Several hundred stone monuments have been unearthed on the ten terraces that cover the 1600-acre property. Some feature the Olmec style with enormous heads and potbellied figures, or the man-jaguar. Many others feature Mayan hieroglyphics and the representation of important figures, often depicted in profile.



It’s intriguing that both styles co-exist. The Olmec style statues don’t stop suddenly and give way to a Mayan style. Nor were they destroyed when the Mayan sculptures were erected. This suggests a shifting of cultural influences and a sharing of artistic styles rather than domination due to one group conquering the other.


Tak’alik Ab’aj was part of a trading route that stretched from Mexico in the north to El Salvador in the south. It has been suggested that as traders moved from one area to another, they brought with them cultural inspirations that influenced the artwork of the settlements.

A royal tomb was discovered in 2002, perhaps belonging to the city's last Mayan king.


Excavations are still underway.

12 comments:

Pam said...

Very interesting. The shows on the History Channel about this culture are interesting also, and so is the royal tomb discovery you picture. It is amazing what great structure the Mayans, etc. built, then to have the people vanish.

Cakelaw said...

That is really interesting. As Pam said, it is amazing that people who bult these structures just vanished.

Claudia said...

Your travels fascinate. Interesting to see the contrast in sculpture with no destruction.

Marcela said...

Wow! This post is so great, Beth. I am so grateful that you share all these amazing facts with us! I feel smarter after reading your blog ! When I was a kid, I wanted to be archeologist! :)

Liz Berg said...

What an interesting bit of history unearthed--and it's refreshing that the new civilization did not destroy the statues they found.

Angie Schneider said...

I always learn something new whenever I visit your blog, Beth. Thanks for sharing!

scrambledhenfruit said...

I've not done a lot of traveling, so I love to see fascinating photos of faraway places I'll probably never visit myself. :)

Pam said...

What a cool & interesting place to explore.

kirstenlopresti said...

What a fascinating trip! Can't wait to see where you'll go next.

Tricia Buice said...

This is so interesting. I bet that was an awesome trip! Love learning about the different places of the world and I just adore traveling - have a great weekend Beth!

Barbara said...

Fascinating blending of two cultures, Beth.

Laura Dembowski said...

So interesting! It's amazing the different things that are located around the world.

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